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2016 INDIAN COMMUNITY CONFERENCE IS ON 4/9/16 FROM 5-10 PM

Posted by Hodalee Scott Sewell on January 28, 2016 at 10:00 AM Comments comments (0)

2016 INDIAN COMMUNITY CONFERENCE IS ON 4/9/16 FROM 5-10 PM

I have secured the Blountstown Civic Center for the 2016 Indian Community Conference in Blountstown on Saturday April 9th 2016, from 5pm to 10 pm. If you want to be listed on the speakers list, make a presentation, or the like please let me know. As this is our 20th year for the conference and big things are happening, including the Sumter Band of Cheraw of SC securing state recognition, the Muscogee Nation of Florida being on active status (public commentary period now open with BIA) and awaiting a decision on federal recognition, upcoming presidential election, and new publications about our people coming out from several sources, please come out and support our people and community. our website Dominickerindians.org continues to have information on our history and current community. As this is a community event feel free to bring a covered dish, your genealogy queries, tribal enrollment questions, or concerns. Email or message me any questions or give me a call. Everyone is welcome.

The Apalachicola River Community of Indians Annual Community Conference is a yearly gathering of the Indian people who descend from the historic Indian settlements of Scotts Ferry, Scott Town, Woods, and Mount Zion in the panhandle of Florida.

Some of the families associated with our community include Ayers Barnwell Bass Bennett Bird Blanchard Boggs Brown Bullard Bunch Bryant Brooks Chason Chavis Conyers Copeland Davis Doyle Goins Hall Harris Hicks Hill Holly Ireland Jacobs Johnson Jones Kever Laramore Linton Lollie Lolly Long Lovett Mainer Martin Mayo Moses Oxendine Perkins Porter Potter Revell Rollin Scott Simmons Smith Stafford Stephens Sweat Thomas Whitfield and Williams.

More can be learned at our website at Dominickerindians.org

 

2016 Indian Community Conference

Posted by Hodalee Scott Sewell on January 28, 2016 at 9:45 AM Comments comments (0)

2016 Indian Community Conference

I will be attempting to secure the Civic Center for the 2016 Indian Community Conference in Blountstown in April soon...If you want to be listed on the speakers list, make a presentation, or the like please let me know anytime...this is our 20th year for the conference and big things are happening, including the Sumter Band of Cheraw of SC securing state recognition, the Muscogee Nation of Florida being on active status ( public commentary period now open with BIA)and awaiting a decision on federal recognition, upcoming presidential election, and new publications about our people coming our from several sources. Pleade come and support our people and community. our website Dominickerindians.org continues to have information on our history and current community.

 

We Will Always Be Here: Native Peoples on Living and Thriving in the South book

Posted by Hodalee Scott Sewell on January 28, 2016 at 9:20 AM Comments comments (0)

We Will Always Be Here: Native Peoples on Living and Thriving in the South, a new book that I contributed a chapter to about our people in Floridas panhandle.

“The Southeastern Indian people found their voices in this work. They are alive and well—still on their land!”—Hiram F. Gregory, coauthor of The Historic Indian Tribes of Louisiana: From 1542 to the Present

“This collection fills a major void in our understanding of recent southern history by offering a wide-ranging selection of southern Indians a chance to speak for themselves, unfiltered, as they strike at the heart of identity: Indian identity, southern identity, and, ultimately, American identity.”—Greg O’Brien, editor of Pre-removal Choctaw History: Exploring New Paths

The history of Native Americans in the U.S. South is a turbulent one, rife with conflict and inequality. Since the arrival of Spanish conquistadors in the fifteenth century, Native peoples have struggled to maintain their land, cultures, and ways of life. In We Will Always Be Here, contemporary tribal leaders, educators, and activists share their struggles for Indian identity, self-determination, and community development.

 

Reflecting on such issues as poverty, education, racism, cultural preservation, and tribal sovereignty, the contributors to this volume offer a glimpse into the historical struggles of southern Native peoples, examine their present-day efforts, and share their hopes for the future. They also share examples of cultural practices that have either endured or been revitalized. In a country that still faces challenges to civil rights and misconceptions about Indian identity and tribal sovereignty, this timely book builds a deeper understanding of modern Native peoples within a region where they are often overlooked.


Strangers in Their Own Land: South Carolina's State IndianTribes book by S. Pony Hill

Posted by Hodalee Scott Sewell on January 28, 2016 at 9:20 AM Comments comments (0)

Harsh "racial" segregation during the Jim Crow era prevented South Carolina's Indian groups from assimilating. Due to their three-fold genetic admixture, they were labeled with such fanciful names as Red Bones, Brass Ankles, Croatans, Turks, and "not real Indians" at all. For generations, South Carolina's remaining Indians struggled to avoid reduction to the oppressed social status of "Negroes." Their desperation eventually fostered anti-Black sentiment within some of the groups, an affliction that still infects a few of the older community members.

 

Generations have passed since the Jim Crow era. Today, the Palmetto State's Indians focus less on imagined "racial purity" and more on the welfare of their communities, preserving their customs, and honoring their ancient traditions.

 

Much work remains to be done by and for all of the tribal groups of South Carolina. The tribes strive to convert state recognition, which now serves only as a morale booster, into a true vehicle to promote tribal educational, economic, and healthcare improvement. South Carolina’s state-recognized tribes are now hard at work to accomplish this goal.

 

"When the author has spent many years traveling to Indian communities around the Southeast and talking to Indian elders, as Pony Hill has done, he must be admired not only for his authenticity, but also for his scholarship. This book, then, is where an authentic perspective is enhanced by thorough scholarship." -- John H. Moore, Ph.D, Anthropology Department, University of Florida.

 

This is the third edition of Pony Hill's ground-breaking study of the Indian tribes of South Carolina.


Red Writings Hood...My new blog about identity in our mixed blood communities and society...

Posted by Hodalee Scott Sewell on January 28, 2016 at 9:05 AM Comments comments (0)

http://redwritingshood.blogspot.com/

My new blog about identity in our mixed blood communities and society...

New Book, Belles of the Creek Nation now available about our people

Posted by Hodalee Scott Sewell on January 28, 2016 at 9:00 AM Comments comments (0)

http://www.amazon.com/Belles-Creek-Nation-American-Bred/dp/0939479508

Belles of The Creek Nation is an innovative and modern perspective investigating the problematic linkages between preservation of cultural heritage, maintaining cultural diversity, defining and establishing cultural citizenship, and ancient tribal rite of passage. It is the first publication to address the notions of cultural diversity among Mixed Blood heritage, tribal culture and sacred rights of the people, all in one book. The relationships and heritage presented provides the basis of humanity's rich cultural diversity among descendants of remnant Indian clans. While there is considerable literature dealing separately with cultural diversity, cultural heritage and tribal rights, this book distinctively presents contemporary relevance in focusing on the intersection between these concepts. Sewell presents the cultural diversity, heritage, citizenship and tribal rights; and establishes a fresh approach that will interest students, descendants and practitioners alike exposing a new and fresh perspective for future work and genealogical study in the Mixed blood Indian heritage of America. "Your blood will mix with ours; and will spread with ours, over this great island…The ultimate point of rest and happiness for (Indians and Americans ) is to let our settlements and theirs meet and blend together, to intermix, and become one people." -Excerpted from a letter written by President Thomas Jefferson to United States Indian Agent to the Creek Nation, Benjamin Hawkins, to relay to Creek leaders, February 18 1803 "Scott Sewell has written the saga of our diverse heritage bringing to light the relationships and powerful influence of the Countrymen within the Native American life , sharing details of the sacred rituals passed down for generations. We are not a lost people but have been hidden in plain sight in our closed communities and clan marriages. There has been a great awakening and now Scott has brought our history out of the darkness and is shining the light on the heritage, lives and struggles of our people in Belles of The Creek Nation." Marilyn Baggett Kobliaka, Redbone Descendant, of the Doyle & Hill Families, Author & Family Historian "Belles of the Creek Nation is a richly detailed narrative of the complex web of interrelated Native American Creek families. Both exciting to read and edifying in content, Sewell has brought to light a little explored area of history with a meticulous eye for detail and flowing writing style. A great addition to the library!" Lars Adams, Author and Independent Researcher "Christopher does a great job of blending introspective genealogy with objective history. I especially liked the last chapter. The tension between tribal leaders wanting to restrict membership (or even expel members) when slicing the pie of financial benefits from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, on the one hand, versus the avalanche of non-clan members seeking (or even demanding) Indian self-identity, on the other, is fascinating. I get the impression that if you ask three random tribal leaders what defines a "true Indian" you will get four conflicting opinions." Frank W. Sweet, History of the U.S. Colorline

Thunderbird Powwow Nov 2015

Posted by Hodalee Scott Sewell on November 18, 2015 at 7:50 PM Comments comments (0)

Nov 2015

Posted by Hodalee Scott Sewell on November 18, 2015 at 7:45 PM Comments comments (0)

gettin thru winter...

Posted by Hodalee Scott Sewell on November 18, 2015 at 7:45 PM Comments comments (0)

chillin at the powwow

Posted by Hodalee Scott Sewell on November 18, 2015 at 7:40 PM Comments comments (0)


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